Take Part in Gibson Island Business Clean-Up Day this February

Would you like to be a part of the plant life restoration at Gibson Island? The Bulimba Creek Catchment Coordinating Group (B4C) is mounting a Business Clean-Up Day at the Paringa Road site on Tuesday, the 26th of February, at 9:00 a.m.

The date coincides with the annual Clean Up Australia Day, which enjoins people to take action in saving the environment.  

Participants to the said event on Gibson Island will be clearing out weeds and planting more trees in an effort to increase the vegetation to benefit species that live and thrive near the Brisbane River and Aquarium Passage in Murarrie.




Meanwhile, restoration efforts at Gibson Island will continue for the next 18 months as the initiative recently received $30,000 in sponsored funds.

The Pratt Foundation committed $20,000 to the project, whilst Queensland Bulk Handling (QBH) will shoulder $10,000 to rehabilitate the mangrove, the home to a colony of grey-headed flying foxes and other subpopulations of fish.


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The grey-headed flying foxes are bats native to Australia. In 2008, the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species identified these mammals as “vulnerable to extinction.”

Photo Credit: GregTheBusker/Wikimedia Commons

The B4C and the Department of Natural Resources spearheaded the cleanup and rehabilitation of Gibson Island in 2018 by clearing out the weeds and planting 3,000 trees. The vegetation should provide shade and protection around the waters of the Aquarium Passage. It will also serve as the breeding ground of small birds like the blue fairy wrens.  

Photo Credit: Bulimba Creek Catchment Coordinating Group/Facebook

On the 25th of January, 56 people returned to this site in Murarrie to plant more trees, which now totals to 3,346. QBH also took this time to hand out the cheque to fund future rehabilitation efforts in the next 12 to 18 months.



Additionally, B4C will be replanting trees and rebuilding the soil around QBH’s 11-hectre land in the Port of Brisbane to also increase the vegetation in the area.